Just Asking the Question

 

 

So wouldn’t it be cool if we could ask folks on the street what they think caused the obesity crisis, and then show them this and ask them again?

Now back to your regularly scheduled blob.

Data from:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  National Center for Health Statistics, Division of National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.  Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity, and Extreme Obesity Among Adults: United States, Trends 1976–1980 Through 2007–2008. 

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10 comments on “Just Asking the Question

  1. […] as a result of the recommendations they’ve made. Why have obesity rates increased in velocity ever since the Dietary Guidelines were enacted? Sure, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but it’s definitely something to consider. Why do […]

  2. Joseph Balfour says:

    This is an exceptional graph. I was wondering if you would mind if I were to use it for an essay regarding ketogenic diet for an A + P class I am doing, I think it would be very enlightening to some of the other students if they choose to read it, the professor as well.

    • Adele Hite, MPH RD says:

      Go for it. But I would recommend that you use the original data to make your own graph–your professor will be more impressed that way ;) Here’s the original data source. The data is on page 5; just add the three categories (overweight, obese, extremely obese) together in a spreadsheet and graph away. Or use the chart at the bottom of page 3–then add your own “here’s where the Dietary Guidelines were created” point. Let me know if I can be of an additional assistance.

  3. [...] as a result of the recommendations they’ve made. Why have obesity rates increased in velocity ever since the Dietary Guidelines were enacted? Sure, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but it’s definitely something to consider. Why do [...]

  4. [...] as a result of the recommendations they’ve made. Why have obesity rates increased in velocity ever since the Dietary Guidelines were enacted? Sure, correlation doesn’t prove causation, but it’s definitely something to consider. Why do [...]

  5. [...] The curious legacy of the USDA Food Guide Pyramid. [...]

  6. OK, I am still on the edge of my seat. Where is the statistical man?

  7. Dr. Dan Egan says:

    You and Denise Minger would get along…death by food pyramid.

    • Adele Hite, RD MPH says:

      We would, I think. But the Food Pyramid happened in the early 90s, after the USDA/HHS noticed that Americans, somehow, for some reason, despite the US Dietary Guidelines instituted a decade before, were still getting fat! And fast. The percent of the population who were classified as overweight/obese (BMI > 25) was 48.5 in 1977/1980 when the low-fat diet was officially sanctioned by the McGovern Committee’s Dietary Goals and then the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines; it was 58.9 in 1990.

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